While preparing serials to either be shelved or prepared for binding, I often discover or receive damaged issues from other Library employees.  These damaged issues are either repaired by our Conservation Lab staff or, if damage is deemed beyond repair, a request for a replacement issue is placed with our Serials Acquisitions unit.

There are three common types of journal repairs which can be performed in our Library Conservation Lab: fill, mend and sew.

A fill done when there is a hole or chunk missing from the issue and an alternate piece of paper is used to fill it in.

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A mend repair occurs when there is a rip or tear in the issue, but it is small and generally fixed with repair tape.

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A sew repair happens when the cover or other pages are coming apart from the journal – a needle and thread is used or sometimes glue instead to alleviate this problem, so the issue can remain intact and be ready for use. 

Sometimes  things in life just seem to strangely intersect.  Earlier this summer, the chair of the Library Advisory Committee, Heidi Hohmann, asked me about treating large landscape architecture plans and happened to mention the fact that Iowa State University was starting the first historic preservation program in the state.  This set off some bells in my head since someone else had just mentioned looking for opportunities in historic preservation in the state.  Although it’s not my area of expertise, even though many confuse historic preservation with library and archives preservation, it is an exciting opportunity to have like-minded folks on campus; others who will not ask why we shouldn’t just make or build a new one and who understand that there is information and history in the object itself.

This new program may be coming to campus at just the right time since the university has a wonderful example of its own that showcases why historic preservation is so important.  With some intervention by a not-for-profit organization, ISU is saving a historical structure that was once used as a geology field studies station by ISU students and researchers outside of Shell, WY.  The building was slated for destruction when the Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation found out about the plans.   The historical structure is an original barrack used at the Heart Mountain Relocation Center during World War II, located between the towns of Cody and Powell, WY.  ISU acquired it in the late 1940s after the town of Gryebull no longer needed it.

Many of these barracks were sold off by the federal government after the war for $1 each to homesteaders.  Because of this, some of the 450 barracks that were built at Heart Mountain continue to exist today as outbuildings, stores, and houses.  ISU is donating the structure so that it can be returned to the Heart Mountain Interpretive Center and used as part of the permanent exhibit.  The Foundation will be responsible for moving the 20 feet wide by 120 feet long barrack the 81 miles back to Heart Mountain.  In addition to being complete, the barrack is a good is candidate for historic preservation since it has had few modifications made to it over the past 70 years.  Another barrack from Heart Mountain was reassembled in Los Angeles next to the Japanese American National Museum in 1994.

Saichi, Suzuyo, and Eddie Seo in front of barrack at Heart Mountain Relocation Center.

Saichi, Suzuyo, and Eddie Seo in front of barrack at Heart Mountain Relocation Center.

For me, this effort is most significant because Heart Mountain is where my family (my grandparents, parents, aunt, and uncles) was incarcerated during the war.  The irony of the photograph above with my grandparents and my father is that my father, an American citizen along with my grandmother, is wearing a Superman sweatshirt.

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My maternal grandfather, Umitaro Ibaraki harvesting tomatoes with Hearth Mountain in the distance. Photo from Northwest College Hinckley Library Special Collections, Ethel Ryan Collection.

My family discovered a photograph of my maternal grandfather working in the fields at Heart Mountain. The photo had been made available online without identifying the man, and my family member provided the name.  A good example of how invaluable it can be to have users identify events, places, and people in photographs.  The photograph is part of the Ethel Ryan Collection which has been made available through their Heart Mountain Digital Preservation Project, which happens to powered by CONTENTdm like ISU Library’s digital collections.  This collection includes documents and photographs focusing on Heart Mountain Relocation Center.

 

Every now and then some books pass through our lab that need a little more reinforcement before going to the shelves. Often these are ones that have a softer cover, design related, floppy, and can’t go to the bindery. soft cover book

What we like to do for these is to put a CoLibri cover on these books – by doing this we are then able to stiffen the cover by slipping a piece of 40pt. board between the inside covers of the book and the CoLibri cover. The covers come in a variety of sizes so they can easily accommodate books of various sizes.

CoLibri cover

CoLibri book cover

We find that these covers hold up pretty well and are easy to replace if needed. They are a nice solution to these floppy books that will most likely be handled frequently.

This post is a follow-up to Adventures in Making Templates: Part I.

In previous posts, I’ve discussed the history of our digital webpages, and the issues I had creating my first templates. I also discussed how to create an initial template page. Now, let’s turn to creating a new page using a template and additional points to keep in mind. To create a new page using a template:

  1. Open Dreamweaver, if not already opened. [I use Dreamweaver CS6.]
  1. To create a page from a template: File—>New… —>Select Page From Template, then navigate to the template page you created.

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Click Create button.

You will notice all your “locked in” code — code that will stay consistent on all pages — is grayed out. You will not be able to edit this area at all on this page. Go on. Try it. Select a section and try to delete it. Can’t. Be. Done. You can select it; but you can’t edit it in any way. However, the areas that are shown in blue or black text are editable areas. So, at the top, you see where I can change my meta content and name, plus page title.

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You also have to be aware that not all areas are obvious as being editable. This is where you need to be aware of your code.

This whole area marked in gray (highlighted here, with text below image) is actually editable space:

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<!– InstanceBeginEditable name=”additional styles go here” –>

 

<!–<link rel=”stylesheet” type=”text/css” href=”../cdm/css/reset.css”>–>

 

<!–additional style types go here–>

 

<!–additional css links go here–>

 

<!– InstanceEndEditable –>

 

Below is an example of code that I placed inside one of these areas:

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Notice that you can put css code, javascript; and css links within this area. This is nice to have, because some pages need additional coding that allows for variances on theme. (As I mentioned in Part I: some of our pages have elements that are unique to each page.)

Further on down the page is the space for the inside content, followed by the non-editable footer.

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It’s pretty easy to go from there. Once you have the page created, save with the actual name you plan to use and you’re set!

Here’s a comparison between our old (non-template) page on the left, and new page (created with template) on the right:

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As you can see, there are subtle differences between the old and new pages. Here’s another example of a longer page:

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One of my main issues without using a template was the variety of space between the end of text and the footer. This was a browser issues: some browsers played nice, and others didn’t. Using a template took this issue away. Our pages are now consistent whatever browser one chooses.  Having the template also made it easier for me to add elements that were lacking on every page, like the social media icons.

Templates are great when you have several pages to maintain that all have the same basic layout. They are not for all sites/layouts, but work well for web masters who have many pages with certain elements that need regular updates. I’ve had templates on my radar since I first started working on my pages. I am glad I finally learned how to create them. You may find them useful too.

CindyAfter spending 45 years on the ISU campus, first as an undergraduate and then as a library employee, Cindy Wahl retired June 1, 2015.  After earning a BA in Craft Design in 1974 and a BA in Art Education in 1975, Cindy started student teaching and realized that teaching might not be the career path for her.  So, in the fall of 1976, she went to the Home Economics placement office (the Art department was in Home Economics) to look at available jobs.  Carolyn Erwin was working in the placement office at the time and asked her what kind of job she wanted.  She replied, “any job that would allow her to move away from home (Anamosa).”  Carolyn said that the library was a good place to work and that she should go to the ISU placement office, which she did that day.  This was back in the day when applicants for merit positions had to take tests.  Cindy took the tests, went home, and received a phone call for a job interview at the library.  She moved into an apartment on Welch Avenue and started as a Clerk I in the Serials Department of the Library on October 18, 1976.  Within 18 months, she was promoted to a Library Assistant I and then to a Library Assistant III.  She worked at the serials Kardex and in Serials Acquisitions.  For a few months she did some basic Serials Cataloging which gave her a better understanding of records which she benefitted from in each position she held in the library.  She supervised the Kardex staff, and continued working in Serials Acquisitions when she was reclassified to a Library Assistant IV.  She spent the next 15 years in the Preservation Department working on vended services including preservation facsimiles, microfilm, digitization, mass deacidification, custom-fit boxes, and library binding, learning a lot about preservation and getting to know a plethora of vendor reps.

Cindy has been a life-long Cyclone fan since her father was a graduate of the ISU Veterinary College and her mom worked for Colonel Pride at the Memorial Union.  Her first memory of Ames was coming with her family when her dad had meetings one summer.  The family went to the Lincoln Way Café in Dog Town and shocked the waitress when 3 young Wahl children, ages 7, 4, and 3, all ordered liver and onions for lunch! Yum!

For Cindy the best part of working at the library has been the people she met and has gotten to know.  Last summer, she even had a library work friend from the 1970’s come to visit.  Over all those years, she has met and worked with so many and she enjoys keeping in touch with them.  The biggest change she witnessed were records in paper form and typewriters shifting to computers and digital records.

Now that she is retired and home from a trip to Chicago to attend her nephew’s wedding, she has stacks of books to read, including the complete library of Agatha Christie; “I need to get busy before the books become brittle.”  (The things you worry about after working in Preservation).  She has started reading one of the books from her stacks.  Her plan is to read a book and pass it on.  She also hopes to do some traveling with her sister and she has a long list of blanket weaving projects for each of her nephews and nieces; “I have more yarn than I have books.”

Thank you Cindy for all of the contributions you have made to the library over 39 years!

The first agricultural engineering department in the world was started at Iowa State in 1905.  It’s now called the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering.  Jay Brownlee Davidson was a professor at Iowa State and is considered to be the “Father of Agricultural Engineering.”  Our archives has a lot of material from J.B. Davidson and we’ve digitized some of it to be available online in our Digital Collections:  http://www.add.lib.iastate.edu/preserv/cdm/agengineering.html

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Digital photographs were taken of entire scrapbooks that J.B. Davidson created from his trips to China and Europe.  In addition to the many photographs included in the scrapbooks, we also scanned many photographs from the early days of agricultural engineering at Iowa State.  We also have a link to our Digital Repository which has J.B. Davidson’s “Introducing Agricultural Engineering in China” from 1949.  With the variety of materials included in our Digital Collections we’ve tried to give people a look at some of the more visually interesting items in our collections and the Digital Repository includes the more scholarly works. This start could lead a curious researcher to find much more by visiting our archives.

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“Peel and stick” are very bad words in the world of books.  We know these as adhesive labels or sheets to correct errors made by editors and publishers.  I haven’t seen one in a while, but this time I found two old sheets as replacement pages in the book Turbidite-Hosted Gold Deposits, GAC Special paper 32, 1986.  This book came to me after a recent mini-water disaster of roughly 1,000 books here in the Parks Library.  The book survived the water disaster very well; however, its old adhesive pages had not.

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There were two “replacement pages” in large sheets that had been inserted as corrective pages for errata, and over time the adhesive had stained other pages, come apart in some areas, and also was very sticky in other areas.  The old “Fasson Crack’n Peel Plus” was failing in several areas.

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To remedy this, I will remove the two adhesive sheets, photocopy the pages onto acid free paper, and tip them in.  I cannot remove the yellow stains on the other pages but can scrape and clean away any remaining sticky residue.  The peel and stick correction seems to be a good idea but in reality is not.

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