I’ve heard this phrase over and over during my lifetime and I have even tested it by getting braces at the age of 41.  Yes 41 and I don’t regret it at all.  Now for many years I have thought to myself almost weekly, “I should go back to school.”  I even convinced my daughter to stay in school and work towards her masters in Business.  Well this year in May I talked with my supervisor, Hilary Seo, and told her of my intentions.  I have not been in school for 33 years and I have classmates that are now starting to retire from their careers and yet I’m planning on returning to school.  I look at this as my new adventure towards retirement.  I will be taking classes towards a Bachelor of Liberal Studies degree from Iowa State University in the hopes of keeping my mind fresh and learning new things, experiencing new things in the Preservation Lab, hopefully a pay raise and job reclassification, and sticking away more money for retirement.  Women in my family tend to live a very long life.  My mother recently passed away in June at 91 and she was a very sharp lady reading newspapers, crossword puzzles, watching interesting TV shows, Bingo, daily Scrabble games to keep her sharp, and learning how to use a tablet at 91.  She was remembered for her great memory and didn’t forget a face.  I want that quality of life in my golden years.

Never Too Late

I’ve been employed in the Preservation Lab since October 1997 and have loved my job from the start learning many new things in the world of book repair and box making.  Now as I repair books I wonder if I will be using some of these books for my classes.  I work on a wide variety of books and find many subjects interesting and glad my classes will be a wide variety of subjects too.  My future plans are to stay with the Preservation Department and my “work family” for as long as I can working in a job I enjoy.

Future Cyclone and Anthropology 309 here I come!

Every library that participates in interlibrary lending has experienced some damage to collection materials at some point in time.  There are, of course, the usual signs of damage we expect in circulating collections like beverage stains, something sticky on the covers, and dog chew.  Then there is the damage caused during transit.  We have received books in their packaging that look as if they have been run over, others that were wet, and once we received a book soaked in meat juices.  But considering the amount that this library lends and borrows, the percentage of damaged materials is low.

Breaking news:  A USPS truck from Ames, Iowa headed to the Des Moines, Iowa USPS sorting facility caught  on fire on Interstate 35.  The good news is that the driver walked away uninjured.  The bad news is that ISU Library had twenty-four packages on the truck.  The packages contained books being interlibrary loaned to other libraries as well as books being returned to various libraries.

burnt books

Remains of library books damaged in the USPS truck fire.

When I heard the news, I was a little surprised since I had never heard of a mail truck catching on fire.  I wanted more details but could not find information on the USPS site or any local media so I simply used a third-party federated search engine (yes, I Googled it).  There were more mail trucks catching on fire across the country than I would have guessed, and these hits did not even include the Ames/Des Moines fire at the time of my search.
Total loss triptic3

The fire occurred on a Tuesday and the first few packages arrived back at the library on Friday.  The items were still in what was left of their packaging and wrapped in plastic.  Some were total losses including an old pocket guide to France and a book on Camp Dodge (local history), while a handful were just a little singed, sooty, and damp.  Interestingly, one book came back with severely burnt packaging but the book itself was only damp; the subject was witchcraft.  More books trickled in over time, some were actually delivered to the receiving library; some libraries immediately returned books to us and other were told to toss them and we would pay to replace them.  Through all of this, the books remained damp and tightly wrapped in plastic.  Surprisingly, nothing was moldy.  I am still perplexed since it is summer in the Midwest.  USPS response to the fire and water damage was to spread out all items on wire racks, with halogen lights on the materials (I’m assuming for heat and/or UV exposure) and fans blowing.  There was no mention of dehumidifiers running.  Then packages were hand sorted and wrapped in plastic.  Their quick response must have prevented the mold; although, I still do not understand how the damp books wrapped in plastic that we received a week later did not show signs of mold, not that I am complaining.

minor damage

For ISU materials, treatment decisions were easy, and books were air-dried and covers removed.  The trickier decisions were what to do with other library’s materials.  I thought about what my reaction would be if one of our books was returned rebound or repaired without my approval, and decided that 1) I might question their judgment and ability to properly treat materials, and 2) my level of acceptable damage that I can live with may be very different from theirs, so I tended toward recommending replacements if the books was relatively new and treatment if it was just a little stained and could be air-dried.  Our head of Resource Sharing communicated with all of the libraries affected by this fire, but none of them were very forthcoming on whether or not they wanted us to treat their materials or simply pay for replacements.  While waiting for responses, these books were also air-dried and flattened.

The lab started to smell like a bar-b-que because of the charred books.  The fumigation trashcan was set-up with Gonzo odor removal bags, the books were placed inside on grates, and the trashcan sealed tightly.  After a few days, the Gonzo was replaced and after several more days the books had a less strong smoky odor, but still noticeably smoky none-the-less.

Damaged books arranged in the fumigation trashcan.

Damaged books arranged in the fumigation trashcan.

This incident is really making me rethink interlibrary lending of any Special Collections and University Archives materials.  In general, we only lend reference materials and University Archives books that are replaceable, but books in the Archives are our faculty publications which are more valuable to us than they are be to other libraries that have them in their circulating collections.  Most, if not all, of these titles are available through other libraries, so I do not feel bad sending the request on to the next lending library.

This spring we noticed the bottom of the movable electronic shelving was dragging on the concrete in Bay 3 at the Library Storage Facility, the library’s remote storage building.  Close inspection revealed some concrete rose above the height of the floor tracks.  Old School Renovations, L.L.C. was brought in to level the concrete under the shelving.  They used a handheld concrete grinder to reduce the high spots along the second track.

red vacuum unit

Vacuum unit.

The equipment includes a vacuum unit with a long hose attached to the grinder.

Grinder with attached hose.

Grinder with attached hose.

The grinder has a circular disk that rotates to cut the concrete. The disk is made of aluminum & magnesium with diamonds.  The base is enclosed in a rubber sheath that captures the dust for the vacuum.

Grinder on its side.

Grinder on its side.

The unit is noisy, but it clears away the concrete and pulls all the dust and particles into the vacuum.  It allows grinding of a small area in close quarters.  We did not have to drape plastic or clean up after the work.  The job required very little participation by staff.  The entire bay took 5 hours to grind.  Mold spots on the ceiling were also removed and they cleaned the interior dock doors.

 

workers

Old School Renovations, L.L.C. workers grinding concrete (left) and removing mold from the ceiling (right).

 

Gary, with Old School, told me the vacuum unit cost $3000 initially and a new filter costs $800.  He commented that dust containment will probably become more of a requirement in the future.  They have invested in training to use this equipment and to handle asbestos.  Old School Renovations, L.L.C. also restored the Tau Beta Pi marker outside Marston Hall this week, removing several layers of paint left by vandals.

Tau Beta Pi marker outside of Marston Hall.

Tau Beta Pi marker outside of Marston Hall.

While preparing serials to either be shelved or prepared for binding, I often discover or receive damaged issues from other Library employees.  These damaged issues are either repaired by our Conservation Lab staff or, if damage is deemed beyond repair, a request for a replacement issue is placed with our Serials Acquisitions unit.

There are three common types of journal repairs which can be performed in our Library Conservation Lab: fill, mend and sew.

A fill done when there is a hole or chunk missing from the issue and an alternate piece of paper is used to fill it in.

fill2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_5735

IMG_5737

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A mend repair occurs when there is a rip or tear in the issue, but it is small and generally fixed with repair tape.

journalrepair5journalrepair



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A sew repair happens when the cover or other pages are coming apart from the journal – a needle and thread is used or sometimes glue instead to alleviate this problem, so the issue can remain intact and be ready for use. 

Sometimes  things in life just seem to strangely intersect.  Earlier this summer, the chair of the Library Advisory Committee, Heidi Hohmann, asked me about treating large landscape architecture plans and happened to mention the fact that Iowa State University was starting the first historic preservation program in the state.  This set off some bells in my head since someone else had just mentioned looking for opportunities in historic preservation in the state.  Although it’s not my area of expertise, even though many confuse historic preservation with library and archives preservation, it is an exciting opportunity to have like-minded folks on campus; others who will not ask why we shouldn’t just make or build a new one and who understand that there is information and history in the object itself.

This new program may be coming to campus at just the right time since the university has a wonderful example of its own that showcases why historic preservation is so important.  With some intervention by a not-for-profit organization, ISU is saving a historical structure that was once used as a geology field studies station by ISU students and researchers outside of Shell, WY.  The building was slated for destruction when the Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation found out about the plans.   The historical structure is an original barrack used at the Heart Mountain Relocation Center during World War II, located between the towns of Cody and Powell, WY.  ISU acquired it in the late 1940s after the town of Gryebull no longer needed it.

Many of these barracks were sold off by the federal government after the war for $1 each to homesteaders.  Because of this, some of the 450 barracks that were built at Heart Mountain continue to exist today as outbuildings, stores, and houses.  ISU is donating the structure so that it can be returned to the Heart Mountain Interpretive Center and used as part of the permanent exhibit.  The Foundation will be responsible for moving the 20 feet wide by 120 feet long barrack the 81 miles back to Heart Mountain.  In addition to being complete, the barrack is a good is candidate for historic preservation since it has had few modifications made to it over the past 70 years.  Another barrack from Heart Mountain was reassembled in Los Angeles next to the Japanese American National Museum in 1994.

Saichi, Suzuyo, and Eddie Seo in front of barrack at Heart Mountain Relocation Center.

Saichi, Suzuyo, and Eddie Seo in front of barrack at Heart Mountain Relocation Center.

For me, this effort is most significant because Heart Mountain is where my family (my grandparents, parents, aunt, and uncles) was incarcerated during the war.  The irony of the photograph above with my grandparents and my father is that my father, an American citizen along with my grandmother, is wearing a Superman sweatshirt.

Ibaraki

My maternal grandfather, Umitaro Ibaraki harvesting tomatoes with Hearth Mountain in the distance. Photo from Northwest College Hinckley Library Special Collections, Ethel Ryan Collection.

My family discovered a photograph of my maternal grandfather working in the fields at Heart Mountain. The photo had been made available online without identifying the man, and my family member provided the name.  A good example of how invaluable it can be to have users identify events, places, and people in photographs.  The photograph is part of the Ethel Ryan Collection which has been made available through their Heart Mountain Digital Preservation Project, which happens to powered by CONTENTdm like ISU Library’s digital collections.  This collection includes documents and photographs focusing on Heart Mountain Relocation Center.

 

Every now and then some books pass through our lab that need a little more reinforcement before going to the shelves. Often these are ones that have a softer cover, design related, floppy, and can’t go to the bindery. soft cover book

What we like to do for these is to put a CoLibri cover on these books – by doing this we are then able to stiffen the cover by slipping a piece of 40pt. board between the inside covers of the book and the CoLibri cover. The covers come in a variety of sizes so they can easily accommodate books of various sizes.

CoLibri cover

CoLibri book cover

We find that these covers hold up pretty well and are easy to replace if needed. They are a nice solution to these floppy books that will most likely be handled frequently.

This post is a follow-up to Adventures in Making Templates: Part I.

In previous posts, I’ve discussed the history of our digital webpages, and the issues I had creating my first templates. I also discussed how to create an initial template page. Now, let’s turn to creating a new page using a template and additional points to keep in mind. To create a new page using a template:

  1. Open Dreamweaver, if not already opened. [I use Dreamweaver CS6.]
  1. To create a page from a template: File—>New… —>Select Page From Template, then navigate to the template page you created.

boutiquePage

Click Create button.

You will notice all your “locked in” code — code that will stay consistent on all pages — is grayed out. You will not be able to edit this area at all on this page. Go on. Try it. Select a section and try to delete it. Can’t. Be. Done. You can select it; but you can’t edit it in any way. However, the areas that are shown in blue or black text are editable areas. So, at the top, you see where I can change my meta content and name, plus page title.

boutiquePage_1

You also have to be aware that not all areas are obvious as being editable. This is where you need to be aware of your code.

This whole area marked in gray (highlighted here, with text below image) is actually editable space:

boutiquePage_2

<!– InstanceBeginEditable name=”additional styles go here” –>

 

<!–<link rel=”stylesheet” type=”text/css” href=”../cdm/css/reset.css”>–>

 

<!–additional style types go here–>

 

<!–additional css links go here–>

 

<!– InstanceEndEditable –>

 

Below is an example of code that I placed inside one of these areas:

boutiquePage_3

Notice that you can put css code, javascript; and css links within this area. This is nice to have, because some pages need additional coding that allows for variances on theme. (As I mentioned in Part I: some of our pages have elements that are unique to each page.)

Further on down the page is the space for the inside content, followed by the non-editable footer.

boutiquePage_4

It’s pretty easy to go from there. Once you have the page created, save with the actual name you plan to use and you’re set!

Here’s a comparison between our old (non-template) page on the left, and new page (created with template) on the right:

boutique_OLD-FINAL-Comparison

As you can see, there are subtle differences between the old and new pages. Here’s another example of a longer page:

boutique_bottom_1-2_comparison

One of my main issues without using a template was the variety of space between the end of text and the footer. This was a browser issues: some browsers played nice, and others didn’t. Using a template took this issue away. Our pages are now consistent whatever browser one chooses.  Having the template also made it easier for me to add elements that were lacking on every page, like the social media icons.

Templates are great when you have several pages to maintain that all have the same basic layout. They are not for all sites/layouts, but work well for web masters who have many pages with certain elements that need regular updates. I’ve had templates on my radar since I first started working on my pages. I am glad I finally learned how to create them. You may find them useful too.

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