Do you remember going on field trips when you were younger? I always thought they were so fun – you got to go to fun places and see neat things (and you got to miss out on school work!). Well I STILL think they are fun so when the opportunity arises we do what we can to take one now and then.

We were lucky enough to be able to drive the short distance down to Des Moines to visit the Archival Products and LBS facilities. A couple of us had been there before but others hadn’t. It’s so neat to visit a place that makes the products we use on a daily basis! And they are happy to have visitors as well, they like to know what we think of the products they make, what would make them better, what do we wish they made. It was an enjoyable and informative trip for all!

making pamphlet binders

making pamphlet binders

 

endsheets

endsheets

 

machine for cutting book cloth

machine for cutting book cloth

 

assorted bookcloth

assorted bookcloth

Preservation’s own, Jim Wilcox, reports on his biking adventure:

During RAGBRAI XLIV 2016 ((Des Moines) Registers Annual Great Bicycle Ride Across Iowa 44 ) July 24-30 I stopped into some of the small town public libraries in the pass through towns. Now I haven’t been to all the small town libraries yet having only done the ride 34 times so far but here are a few from this year.

Early in the week was a stop at the Villisca Public Library, population 1252 according to the 2010 Census. A building built in 1908 with only updates to mechanical systems and the addition of an elevator. A Carnegie Library that cost $10,000 to build and furnish (books not included).

You may have heard of Villisca for another reason, the still unsolved ax murder of 8 people while they slept on the night of June 10, 1912. http://www.villiscaiowa.com/index.php

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Villisca Library, 1908

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Villisca Library Basement

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Villisca basement, and next to it the main floor collection and Mr. Carnegie

Another stop during the week was at the Humeston Library, population 494 from the 2010 Census. A town founded in 1872 it is within ¼ of a mile halfway between the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers.

“With the increasing demand for technology and neutral gathering space for the community, the space became too small to hold a thriving and growing library.  In August of 2003 the Library Board of Trustees began a building fund in anticipation of someday building a new building to house the library.  With tremendous community support of that vision, the library opened in its new spacious location on April 26, 2008”

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Humeston Library, 2008

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Humeston collection

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More of the Humeston collection

On to Moravia, population 665 from the 2010 Census.  ” Moravia is named for the religious faith. Moravian families left Salem, North Carolina in 1849 to start a colony in the west. Money was sent to purchase forty acres of land for a town site by several benevolent Moravian sisters. It was their wish that town lots be sold and the money be used to build a Moravian Church. The families made the long journey to Iowa and acquired many acres of land. “

“The Moravia Public Library was established in 1941.   It is situated in the center of the Moravia City Park and serves as a hub in the community.  In 1980 there was an addition built on the south side of the building.  This addition serves as a meeting place for several civic organizations, reunions, receptions and houses displays of crafts and foods during the annual Moravia Fall Festival.  In 1984 the Library was enlarged and renovated by volunteer labor, then again in 2001 the Library was increased in size by approximately half the original size.  It’s now 2,200 square feet.”
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Moravia Library, the front porch was being used as a stage, something that has been done there for a long time. The building was moved to its current location by horse power and steam tractors when the school was built

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Inside the Moravia Library

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Nice mural in the Moravia Library

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Books signed by hometown womens basketball star Molly Bolin and a Moravian Star.

The Moravian star originated in Saxony, Germany, in the two towns of Niesky and Kleinwalka in the 1830s. The stars were used as craft projects to help demonstrate geometry lessons to young boys attending Moravian school. The stars were quickly adopted by the Moravian Church as a symbol of the birth of Jesus and represented the star of Bethlehem. Traditionally, the star is hung the first Sunday of Advent and remains up until Epiphany, January 6, or the time of the coming of the Magi.”

http://www.villisca.swilsa.lib.ia.us/

http://www.humeston.lib.ia.us/

http://www.moravia.lib.ia.us/

 

So, lately, I have been working on a new page/site for Digital Initiatives that will eventually become the start page/site for a variety of digital sites under our department. Currently, as you may remember, this is our start page: http://digitalcollections.lib.iastate.edu/. I cannot reveal the new start page, because we are still in the process of creating it. However, I thought I’d focus on one component of the page/site that we have not previously used before: forms.

Now, before Drupal, forms were a pain in keister to create. But now, with a great support staff on hand, forms are super easy to build. Let me show you how.

Forms are a part of Drupal that needs to be “turned on,” in order to work. In our set-up they are turned off to avoid confusion. Also, keep in mind, that once it is turned on, it is available on all pages you create within your site. When it does get turn it on, the magic begins.

I created a Test page to show you how to create a form and how forms work.

It’s very similar to a non-form Drupal edit page, except for the tab just to the right of Edit says Webform.
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Let’s click on that.
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There are five different sections under the Webform. The first one, form component, is where you add the important parts of the form being created, such as a person’s name, email, address, connection, and comments.

Let’s create a super simple form, which includes person’s name, email, an additional textfield for funnsies, and a comment box.

First, we’ll click inside the “New component name” box, and type Name. The type is Textfield, so we’ll leave that. Now, click on the “Add” button.
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Note: this is only a partial screenshot of the page that comes up. Scroll down the age to look over the other boxes you can use to manipulate this info, including making this box a required value. A required value is a value that is needed to proceed. A red star will show up next to the label. Also, on these required fields, I place in parenthesis (required). [I have recently learned that some colorblind users cannot make the distinction between red and black, so adding this helps.] Other fields that are worth looking at: Display. Here you can set the width of the component, add a placeholder in the box (like: myname@abc.com). Also check out the label display. Under this, you can change the label to be displayed above, inline, below the box; description can be displayed above the field; disable the field completely, or make it private, so only users with access can view the results. These preferences can be found on most of the component pages. For now, nothing else is needed, so scroll all the way down and click “Save component” at the bottom.

Let’s add Email now. Label it, “Email,” and change the type to “E-mail,” then tick the “Required” box. Click “Add.”
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Oops. I made a mistake. I forgot to label email “Email (required)”. No sweat. Just click on “Edit” beside the Email label, and on the next page, change the title in the label name. Scroll down and click “Save component”.

In the next window, make sure short form is checked for email format, and that “Required” is ticked. You might want to tick “Unique,” under “Validations.” Scroll down to click on “Save component.”

Now, let’s add another textfield.

Here, I’m going to get goofy to show you different things you can do with the form. In this window, check to make sure “Required” is ticked.
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I made the Display width 75; I added a Placeholder (to be shown inside field until user starts typing); I Prefixed the textbook with craziness, and Postfixed it with more craziness. Finally, I placed the Label Display to None.

Let’s add the comment box now. Name it “More comments (required)”; choose textarea; make it “Required”; in the next window: make Validation “Required”; and make sure Resizable is ticked under Display; scroll down and click “Save component”.

Here’s what the final super simple form looks like:
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Notice that there is no red star anywhere near the “I’m glad” text field. This is something to be aware of, if you decided to hide the label. If any one of those red star areas is left blank, the user will not be able to move forward. OK? OK!

But WAIT! We’re not done yet.

Back under Webform, you can see there is a few more section to the right of Form components: Conditionals, Form validation, E-mails, Form settings. The ones to be most concerned with are E-mails, and Form settings.

Under E-Mails, add the address where you want the comments from the form to be sent to, then click “Add”. In the next page:
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Make sure all the email addresses are correct. Custom email/names should be used where you what the emails to go/or what you want the emails to be from called, when the Default email/name is incorrect; E-mail from name should be that address as well. Also check to make sure E-mail header is the right page from where the email are originating. OK. Scroll to bottom, click “Save e-mail setting.”

Let’s move over to Form setting. This page is a doozy, with many options to choose from; my advice: choose wisely, little grasshopper.
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First one, most important: I recommend you place a confirmation message in the first box; you have the option of using Full HTML, Filtered HTML, and Plain text. Also, you can add a re-direct page for the confirmation page. Keep the Total submissions at unlimited; make sure Status of this form is ticked for Open. (Closing prohibits further submissions by other users.)

2nd half of page:
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These are all self-explanatory. Notice on the bottom under Next submission order. This number should be 1 if you have just created the form; otherwise the number will be whatever number is currently submitted for the form.

One last note: To the right of the Webform tab is a Results tab. This tab shows the results from the form on the page.
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Of course, there isn’t much on here right now, but this page will list every form submitted by users, default setting is recently to oldest. Under Operations, will be additional links: View Edit Delete. You can either click on the number under #, or View under Operations corresponding to the number to see the actual submitted form.

Drupal makes it so easy to create and maintain forms. I hope they are as helpful to you as they are for us.

 

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June 28-30, 2016 Iowa State University hosted the Iowa 4-H Youth conference titled “Dive to the Depths”. Students grades 8-12 from all over Iowa converged on the ISU campus to participate in group activities and workshops. Every year  almost 1000 kids attend! The workshops introduce the students to new professional environments and careers.  They also give participants an opportunity to develop practical life skills that they will use throughout their lives.

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I taught three  workshops about books at the Parks Library preservation lab. At the start of each workshop I did a short presentation about the history of books, into which I crammed as many interesting images as I could find. Then we made a fold-up book and sewed a pamphlet out of multi-colored papers. Most of the participants already had extensive sewing experience. Many had made a quilt or an outfit before, so it took them all of 3 minutes to sew a simple pamphlet! Oops, I will have to step it up with the difficulty level next year!

IMG_1053  samples

At the end of the session I showed the 4-H-ers some conservation projects that I was working on. Many of them were really curious about the chemistry of the materials that they saw – both the artifacts and the conservation supplies. They answered my questions readily and were not too shy to ask their own, which I appreciated.

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I’ve reached a point where I realize I need some (technology) help.

An image showing a routing form versus project management software charts

Choices….

Balancing the needs of at least eight people, 5 units, and three divisions is hard! We all need to share a workflow for building digital projects from primarily paper-based archival materials. New projects entail, at a minimum, the digital collections team: the entire Digital Initiatives staff, and at least one person from Special Collections and University Archives, Preservation, Metadata and Cataloging, and the Research and Instruction Division, currently represented on the team by the Science & Technology department. Library IT and Central IT may also play a role, depending on the project.

In order to work efficiently and at capacity, we run more than one project at a time. Additionally, I manage the queue – there are always requests for new projects waiting in the wings or projects we’ve thought of that would provide new kinds of access to some of the Library’s collections. It’s my job to assess priorities and fit these into the existing work when I can.

Everyone has their own way of working that makes the most sense for them. My flavor of managing my work is very analytical and visual heavy. I love diagrams and charts, spreadsheets, and estimations. I am soothed by massive spreadsheets and complicated business process modeling!

Our needs are varied, as are our schedules. We’ve been managing the work through team communication and a routing sheet, but we need more. Our project scopes have expanded, we’ve added new people to the digital collections team, and the various units have new procedures that need to be incorporated into our shared work. So, I am on the hunt for a comfortable project management solution. If it’s not comfortable for all of us, it won’t get used and it won’t work. I want it to be something that eases my hunger for charts and analysis, while also being streamlined enough that someone could else just see the tasks they need to get done that week. We’re testing some options and will hopefully come up with something that eases burden rather than adding to it.

Do you also have project management challenges? If so, please share!

 

 

Our Digital Collections include a variety of different things.  The digital collection management system that we use is CONTENTdm hosted by OCLC.  We try to come up with the best way to present our various materials online so that they not only look good but are as useful as possible to people that want to access them.  Sometimes they are individual images but often they are large multipage items so we combine the digitized images together into a PDF.  One interesting difference between a single image and a PDF is that while an image will look the same to all the people who view our collections online, a PDF can look different depending on the web browser a person uses.

Different browsers include their own PDF plug-ins for viewing a PDF online.  Below are three images of the exact same item in our digital collections.

The first one is viewed in Internet Explorer
InternetExplorer

The second one is viewed in Firefox
Firefox

And the third one is viewed in Google Chrome
GoogleChrome

While the images look similar, all the tools or buttons for using the PDF look different and are located in different places along the top and sides of the image.  I’ve found out from first-hand experience that this can be a little confusing if two people are viewing the same thing but on different browsers and they’re conversing on the phone or through email about how to use the various tools.  While this isn’t really a big deal, it’s good to be aware that even though we strive for consistency in the look and usability of our digital items, we can’t control the differences that show up when using different web browsers.

 

Talking to design students about conservation of special collections

Talking to design students about conservation of special collections

A couple of months ago I hosted a tour for a College of Design class, which focused on binding and printing  design in the context of current publishing practices. Preparing for this tour prompted our technician Mindy and myself to seek out contemporary binding structures from our general collections that present preservation challenges for library professionals.

Most of these items ended up being art books. Because of innovations in the realm of  publishing, many coffee table books now feature all kinds of fancy bells and whistles, going for a unique look with an element of surprise. There is a tendency to deconstruct the traditional book form.  What that means for us here in the Preservation Department is: ENCLOSURES! These unconventional bindings and textblocks require an extra level of protection for a variety of reasons. Dear reader, behold the art book medley!

Colibri Jackets – why do we need them?
Colibri

1. The spine of a book needs all the protection it can get.
2. Fabrics and 3D elements can rub against other books on the shelf.
3. Loosely associated items: a sticky note serves as a title label.
4. Exposed board edges will delaminate extra quickly.

Boxes and pockets

Boxes_Pockets

1. Some binding structures are inherently vulnerable to handling. A 4-flap made from a lightweight board, also called a tux box, will do just fine for this delicate binding.
2. & 3.  Security is important: enclosures can help keep small desirable items from walking off the shelf.
4. The artist print that comes included with this monograph is larger than the book.
This sturdy 4-flap, called a phase box, had to be retrofitted with a spacer to keep the two items from shifting around inside.

And sometimes…
Books come to us with their own boxes, and they need a little help. Here are three examples of that, clockwise from left to right:

BooksInBox

  1. A collection of vintage recipes in its original box packaging. The lid of the box got ripped off. It was later hinged back on with a strip of matching book cloth.
  2. Inside the Tide box there is a soft cover paperback book. The box was not as secure as we would have liked. In addition, the ingenious colorful box  presents a real temptation for a library user to take it home. So the book got an additional clamshell box (a nice boring gray).
  3. The multiple small books contained in the tan cloth box are all identified by the same bar code, pasted onto the side of the box. There are no volume numbers present. So, each individual book within the box got its own label, even though they all say the same thing. This way the books can be better tracked if one of them gets lost.
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