Digital Collections


Back in March of 2018, our department conservator Sonya wrote a blog piece about the slides and papers in the Hortense Butler Heywood Collection here at ISU. The collection was digitized, and is now online for public viewing. One viewer, Kelli Ireland, stumbled across our piece and the collection while researching her barn in an effort to get it listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Kelli reached out to Sonya to let her know that Heywood’s name is quite literally written on her barn!

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“Mrs. R.E. Heywood 8-29-1929” photograph by Kelli Ireland, Clay County, Iowa

Hortense Butler Heywood was a well known entomologist who was born and raised right here in Iowa. She co-authored the book, Handbook of the Dragonflies of North America and is also known for her detailed illustrations of specimens.

Ireland’s family rented the property from Hortense’s daughter Julia for a number of years before purchasing the land. How cool for this family to have such an interesting piece of history in their own yard! Thank you to Kelli for sharing this wonderful information with us, and for allowing us to update our readers!

 

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The Butler Heywood Barn photograph by Kelli Ireland, Clay County, Iowa.

This program for the ISU vs. University of Minnesota football game, held on October 24, 1896, has seen better days. After being used as a scorecard, presumably by a fan who attended the game, rolled up (possibly by the same nervous fan), nibbled on by insects, and hastily put back together with two separate campaigns of pressure-sensitive tape, this object has finally arrived at the Preservation Lab for treatment prior to digitization.

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Back cover with notations

The treatment involves removing the tape holding the covers and leaves together and then reassembling the fragments and mending with tissue and wheat starch paste. The tape removal has been tricky so far, accounting for the majority of the treatment hours. Since there are two different types of tape, the ideal method for removing the carrier and reducing the adhesive residue has to be found separately for each kind.

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Removing the plastic tape carrier with a heated spatula.

The plastic carrier is removed using heat (or peeled straight off, if the adhesive is degraded enough), and then the remaining adhesive is removed from the surface of the paper using a combination of erasers, heat, and mechanical reduction using a scalpel blade. In some cases, the staining from the tape adhesive can be removed with solvents. For this archival object, however, the aesthetic outcome of the treatment is less important than the physical stabilization, and the staining will be left untreated.

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Emilie working on a few pages at a time

It was hoped that the booklet could be reassembled after mending, but it appears the individual leaves are too fragile for that level of manipulation and will be individually encapsulated in polyester sleeves.

RS24_6_0_5_b1_f1_1896_AT_enclosure

Encapsulated pages in a 4-flap enclosure

This program is one of hundreds in the University Archives’ ISU Dept. of Athletics Football collection that have been digitized for public viewing online. Early films of ISU football games will be showcased at a tailgating event, hosted by Special Collections and University Archives at the November 11th football game with Oklahoma State. Visitors to the library’s tent will be able to view objects from the collections, such as football programs from years past, banners, buttons, commemorative beanie hats and early photographs and learn more about the history of the University and the Athletic Department.

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During treatment: group photo of the 1896 team from the football program

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From the University Archives: image of the 1895 football team

 

In 2016 the Iowa State University Library completed a six-year project to digitize an entire run of the campus yearbook, The Bomb. Comprised of nearly 45,000 pages, the digital versions are not easily searchable due to the wide variety of fonts and graphic elements used throughout the decades. Just look at the text from one page of the 1911 Bomb. The font and layout are unique, making the automated transcription process nearly impossible.

LD2548-Io9b-1911-012

(“Bomb 1911”, page 9)

With that in mind, in its inaugural “Unsolved Histories” Project the Iowa State Digital Initiatives Unit has launched a crowd sourcing transcription project entitled, “Transcribed the Bomb.” It is our hope that by transcribing these yearbooks a wider audience can explore and find memories of themselves, their families and friends, favorite campus moments, and world events through the Iowa State University lens. Here is how YOU can get started:

  1. Navigate to the following website: (http://yearbook.lib.iastate.edu/) You will arrive to a page that looks like this:bomb1
  2. There are two ways to start contributing. You can either click “Sign-in” to create a profile or you contribute anonymous by just clicking “start.”
  3. If you chose to make a profile you will need to navigate back to this page and click “start.”
  4. A year of the “Bomb” will appear, after clicking “contribute now” and you will be able to begin the transcription process!!!

bomb2

5. Once you start contributing you will be asked two questions before you are able to transcribe a page. The questions include: a) Is the page black? (If the page is blank, it will be skipped and you will be taken to the next page.) b) Does this page have text? (This meaning text, images with text, tables, page numbers, etc.)

6. Then you can begin transcribing!! Here are a few tips for transcribing:

  • Transcribe exactly what you see
  • Use [Image(s)] to indicate if there is image or images
  • Hand-drawn or illustrations should be treated as text rather than images
  • Transcribe captions or image titles
  • Do not transcribe text found on clothing, pennants, sings, or other sources within the image.

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(Here is a view of the transcription Page)

7.Once completed you can review the text and then submit the page

8.Repeat the steps to transcribe more ISU moments!

If you need more help you can find an interactive tutorial, examples and printable instructions on the ISU Library Guide Page: http://instr.iastate.libguides.com/transcribe or feel free to contact us at any time at: digital@iastate.edu.

Good luck and happy transcribing!!

Two months ago, I posted in this space about moving the Digital Collection pages over to Drupal. The pages have all been moved over now, and they are live (http://digitalcollections.lib.iastate.edu/.) In this post, I’m going to dive deeper into Drupal and explain one of the things I really like about using Drupal: the Page Tree.  When you use the Page Tree, page names become very easily identifiable. No more: .html pages. Now pages simply end with: [page name here]. The page tree method allows logical, and easy to understand organization. There are a few items to keep in mind, and I’ll explain those as we proceed.

Say you’re on Carver’s page. That URL is:

http://digitalcollections.lib.iastate.edu/george-washington-carver

All subsequent pages associated with carver will end like this:

[carver URL]/biography

[carver URL]/resources

[carver URL]/magazine-and-journal-articles

I could have gone inside the page and drilled down further. For example, I could have had the links on the resources pages link off of the resources page. (Which would look like: /resources/magazine-and-journal-articles, signifying that it was located off the resources page, but I didn’t do that for this site.)

Here is an example of what a page tree looks like:

pagetree.jpg

Notice on the page tree page, there is a list underneath the Tree icon (Home,) and then each little white triangle turns black when you open it, and shows the pages associated with it below. folder2.jpgicons (looks like a folder,) represent actual pages, where the  link2.jpg  icon (looks like a piece of chain,) represents a link. When the selected page is highlighted (here in blue,) the Page Properties are indicated for that page. Notice that the page tree pages/links are in red. Not all page trees have links this color. After the styles were added, these link turned from default black to red. I’ll have to see what happens with the links on the Special Collection as I start to style them.

I really like the Page Properties; it gives a lot of good, self-explanatory information.  Right from this window, you can Change Settings; Make a New page/link (which will become associated with this page;) Edit the page/link; Change Permissions (I strongly recommend NOT doing anything with this, unless directed by the IT department;) View the page/link; Trash the page/link. Let’s click on the Change button.

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On Page Properties Change page, you can change the Visibility of the page, Nav Title, and Path. Save or Cancel, when done. Now, I am going to tell you about some things I learned when using the Nav Title/Path boxes. Say you have a title that goes like this: Pascal’s Photos & More. This is what the page tree path will appear as: pascal-s-photos—more. [Ed. Note: it will look like three dashes after photos, not one long dash.] Notice that Drupal takes out the apostrophe and “&” and replaces it with “-“. This is important to remember. It doesn’t mean you can’t have the page title be Pascal’s Photos & More, only that you will need to go into the path and manual change it to pascals-photos-more. You can take out the extra dashes and the path will still work. This is where the Change page of the Page Properties really become useful. The Visibility box is useful as well. Checking it off makes the become “invisible” to the public. You can still “see” the page, when you are logged in, under the Page Tree. And if you have that page linked on other Drupal pages, it will still be linked for use. This comes in handy when you have a lot of pages and you only want some to show when the menu is displayed. Here is an example of an invisible page in the page tree:

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The link is grey, and italicized, to indicate invisibility.

OK, let’s click Cancel on the Page Properties page to back up. There is one more feature I will share today in Drupal that is handy in a pinch. (And goodness knows, I’ve been in a pinch once or twice…or, well, never mind.) When logged in to make changes on the Drupal pages, there are few tabs across the top of each page.

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View, Edit, Revisions, Permissions, Drafts. Let’s look quickly at Revisions.

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What a wonderful feature. A real lifesaver, believe you, me! If you goof-up on a page you can easily go back in time and select the revision you need, whether a minute ago, or last week. This is a nice way to work, and fairly worry free. That makes working with Drupal pretty fool-proof. Which is why so many people are able to use Drupal without much training at all.

So, remember back to May 19 of this year when I began talking about creating templates in Dreamweaver, and again on July 21, when I blogged part two of that series? And also remember how I drone on about technology always changing?

Well…. Throw those two blogs out the window and digest this: I am no longer using Dreamweaver to make our webpages. Our library has moved to Drupal for content-based webpages. And in doing so, I needed to learn it quick. Now, granted, I was given a great deal of leeway as to when to implement this for our pages. I could wait a year. But I had my own agenda. Not only did I need to move Digital Collection pages over, but also Special Collection pages. And I set my timeline to be the end of 2015. Well…why not?

Let me take this blog space to begin talking about Drupal, and my first impressions.

First, the benefit for the library is that more departments are allowed to contribute their own content, instead of having someone from IT doing it, thereby causing a delay in getting the information up to researchers. Because Digital Collections and Special Collections has been creating their own pages for several years now, we were made the testing team to see if we could get this done, and how long it would take. (We meaning: me. I have all but taken over maintaining the Special Collection pages. Brad Kuennen has taken on more responsibilities, leaving most of the fun work to me. Yea ME!)

But back to self-authoring. This is a good thing for a large portion of library departments. Allowing each department to design and implement their pages grants those departments to update their information on the fly and this pretty awesome too.

Plus, to have “templates” in place helps to maintain the overall layout theme of the university. In having a consistent design, every page of the university appears more uniform. Then there is the concept of responsive design. I myself have had issues with this very thing in the past. This is where Drupal comes in and does the heavy lifting. Once you’ve created a page, it automatically makes it responsive. In other words, whether displayed on desktop or mobile device, or tablet, the page will be displayed in the best possible manner. The image(s) will shrink down to the appropriate size and what is called a hamburger will appear (typically in the upper left or right hand corner of the page,) for the drop-down menu.

Home_hbgr

(This is what a “hamburger” looks like on a sized-down, (read: mobile) responsive page. It squishes a menu down into the three horizontal line icon; when you tap on it, it drops the menu down; again, it usually appears on mobile-designed pages.)

So, what does that mean for designing pages going forward then? Well, a lot of things. First of all, because our library has a great library-external, but on-campus, support from the ITUIS department, I don’t have to worry about consistency across web browsers as I had to in the past. The ITUIS department has worked those issues out with Drupal already. We don’t have to re-invent the wheel here; they follow ISU template guidelines and work from there. Thankfully, because Digital Collections and Special Collections are on a separate server, this allows us to maintain our sites separately, which in turn gives us even greater control over the design and layout of our pages. But what does that really mean? There are differences; let’s take a look.

Here’s our old page on desktop, created in Dreamweaver:

Home_old2

And here’s the new, created in Drupal:

Home_new

The first obvious difference is the spacing in the vertical menu on the left. Drupal doesn’t allow close spacing (at least on the theme that ISU maintains.) The slider image is wider, but height is narrower; and the dark boxes are no longer as clearly separated (no white line between them.) These images are both pretty similar on tablets; the only difference being that for Drupal, the menu runs a little longer down the side, and the boxes on bottom are clearly separated:

Home_tab_ls

BUT, take a look at the portrait view layout on a tablet.

Old Home (Dreamweaver) on mobile and tablet, portrait view:

Home_mobile_old

(In portrait, you just get a piece of the image, as it is a fixed layout. This is a desktop view of mobile device. An actually mobile device would cut off the top of the second box; but the layout is identical.)

New Home (Drupal) on tablet, portrait view:

Home_tab_port

(A lot better separation here, plus no cut-off of images.

And New Home (Drupal) on mobile:

Home_mobile

The point is Drupal makes designing responsive pages pretty easy. The most intensive part was copy and pasting the pages over from Dreamweaver, and constantly contacting the ITUIS department to get the styles displaying correctly. I’m glad I started with the smaller Digital Collection site however, because when we attempted to make the new pages go live, everything was defaulting to a wrong URL link. First, we thought we were going to need to manually re-mapped all the pages to the new pages, so that old URLs would bounce to the new page URL. Now, ITUIS has stepped in and indicated they will be able to solve this issue using another tool. We will have to monitor this unfolding drama and we will have to think it through for the larger Special Collection pages.

This post is a follow-up to Adventures in Making Templates: Part I.

In previous posts, I’ve discussed the history of our digital webpages, and the issues I had creating my first templates. I also discussed how to create an initial template page. Now, let’s turn to creating a new page using a template and additional points to keep in mind. To create a new page using a template:

  1. Open Dreamweaver, if not already opened. [I use Dreamweaver CS6.]
  1. To create a page from a template: File—>New… —>Select Page From Template, then navigate to the template page you created.

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Click Create button.

You will notice all your “locked in” code — code that will stay consistent on all pages — is grayed out. You will not be able to edit this area at all on this page. Go on. Try it. Select a section and try to delete it. Can’t. Be. Done. You can select it; but you can’t edit it in any way. However, the areas that are shown in blue or black text are editable areas. So, at the top, you see where I can change my meta content and name, plus page title.

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You also have to be aware that not all areas are obvious as being editable. This is where you need to be aware of your code.

This whole area marked in gray (highlighted here, with text below image) is actually editable space:

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<!– InstanceBeginEditable name=”additional styles go here” –>

 

<!–<link rel=”stylesheet” type=”text/css” href=”../cdm/css/reset.css”>–>

 

<!–additional style types go here–>

 

<!–additional css links go here–>

 

<!– InstanceEndEditable –>

 

Below is an example of code that I placed inside one of these areas:

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Notice that you can put css code, javascript; and css links within this area. This is nice to have, because some pages need additional coding that allows for variances on theme. (As I mentioned in Part I: some of our pages have elements that are unique to each page.)

Further on down the page is the space for the inside content, followed by the non-editable footer.

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It’s pretty easy to go from there. Once you have the page created, save with the actual name you plan to use and you’re set!

Here’s a comparison between our old (non-template) page on the left, and new page (created with template) on the right:

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As you can see, there are subtle differences between the old and new pages. Here’s another example of a longer page:

boutique_bottom_1-2_comparison

One of my main issues without using a template was the variety of space between the end of text and the footer. This was a browser issues: some browsers played nice, and others didn’t. Using a template took this issue away. Our pages are now consistent whatever browser one chooses.  Having the template also made it easier for me to add elements that were lacking on every page, like the social media icons.

Templates are great when you have several pages to maintain that all have the same basic layout. They are not for all sites/layouts, but work well for web masters who have many pages with certain elements that need regular updates. I’ve had templates on my radar since I first started working on my pages. I am glad I finally learned how to create them. You may find them useful too.

The first agricultural engineering department in the world was started at Iowa State in 1905.  It’s now called the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering.  Jay Brownlee Davidson was a professor at Iowa State and is considered to be the “Father of Agricultural Engineering.”  Our archives has a lot of material from J.B. Davidson and we’ve digitized some of it to be available online in our Digital Collections:  http://www.add.lib.iastate.edu/preserv/cdm/agengineering.html

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Digital photographs were taken of entire scrapbooks that J.B. Davidson created from his trips to China and Europe.  In addition to the many photographs included in the scrapbooks, we also scanned many photographs from the early days of agricultural engineering at Iowa State.  We also have a link to our Digital Repository which has J.B. Davidson’s “Introducing Agricultural Engineering in China” from 1949.  With the variety of materials included in our Digital Collections we’ve tried to give people a look at some of the more visually interesting items in our collections and the Digital Repository includes the more scholarly works. This start could lead a curious researcher to find much more by visiting our archives.

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