Experiments


Hortense Butler Heywood papers and microscope slides, early 1900’s

Hortense Butler Heywood was an entomologist who was also a prolific illustrator. A lot of her work focused on the study of dragonflies. The collection of her papers at Iowa State University Archives includes several dozen microscope slides with samples of dragonfly parts. Below are images of some slides and their extreme-zoom closeups. The slides are in fragile condition and would be tricky to view in the reading room on the light box. Digitizing them made a lot of sense. So we did it! And we loved every minute of it. A link to the complete Heywood digital collection can be found on the bottom of the  Women in Science and Engineering webpage:

 

 

 

 

 

 

So, how did we do it exactly?  My first idea was to use the camera attached to the microscope to generate an image. But, sadly, the picture was too blurry and indistinct. Plan B was to use a light box and our nice Nikon D4 SLR camera on the copy stand. The massive resolution of the image files made it possible to zoom in and see the details of the specimens. Without magnification the samples looked like tiny specs of debris. With magnification they were intriguing and presented a direct link to Ms. Heywood’s illustration work.

Organizing the slides

Making sure the slides are organized and ready to go before reformatting starts.

The photo setup

Positioning the slide so that only a minimum amount of cropping is necessary.

Digital imaging

Shooting raw files, at 600 dpi.

Mindy McCoy is editing in Photoshop

The only alteration to the raw files was to crop the images  and to save them as TIFFs.

Lawrence H. Skromme farming goods catalogs

Another digital  adventure, which promises to be ongoing for a while, is working with a comprehensive collection of ephemera related to farm machinery and equipment. The cards, pamphlets and catalogs  date from mid-1800s to early 1900s. This collection is frequently requested in the reading room by students and professors involved in courses on mechanical engineering, agricultural sciences and history of farming.

Archivists from ISU’s Special Collections have already written some blog posts about the Skromme collection: Ephemera in the Archives and Agricultural Machinery Product Literature.

Party in the front. Butcher & Gibbs Plow Co., Imperial Plows advertisement card, date unknown.

Business in the back. Butcher & Gibbs Plow Co., Imperial Plows advertisement card, date unknown.

Many of the catalogs have been used extensively in the field (literally in the field), folded and stuck into pockets, left in barns and tractors – you get the idea… And keep in mind that the paper they were printed on was never meant to last (ephemera!). Direct physical handling of this stuff basically kills it. So, this large collection was a wonderful candidate for digitization. And what fun it has been to review! See for yourselves…

Powerful lady of multi-tasking. J.M. Childs & Co., Tiger Self Dump Wheel Horse Rake advertisement card, not dated.

This image of a patriotically-clad woman riding a roaring tiger, while also managing to plow, has been very inspiring to me.

Project Management:

Clearly, these objects need to be available online so a large number of people can see them. Working on several concurrent digitization projects requires collaboration, concise and clear communication and tight organization across department lines.  Adopting a project management software tool has really enhanced our efforts.

We use Meister Task to track progress of items as they pass through the Selection-Conservation-Digitization-Metadata pipeline. The software is easy to use and visually pleasing. I will even venture to say that using the interface is somewhat intuitive.

Repairs:

What about numerous conservation repairs that are needed to stabilize the super-fragile and damaged ephemera for digitization? My strategy has been to expedite without cutting corners. Using remoistenable (pre-coated) tissue has helped save time. One benefit is the quick drying time. Another benefit is the ability to use 5 gsm or 3.5 gsm tengucho tissue with ease and expediency. The tissues are pre-coated with a mix of diluted wheat starch paste and 4M methyl cellulose, per handout from the 2009 LCCDG/ACDG session. Most of the paper that needs to be mended in this project is lightweight and fragile, so the thinner tissues are a good fit.

Applying remoistenable tissue mends. C. Altman & Co., Buckeye Annual Catalog, 1889

For  many of the pamphlets, the covers have become detached from the textblocks. Since they will be digitized on the OpticBook book-edge scanner, which also functions as a flatbed scanner, it would not make sense to reattach the pages. The materials are archival and are meant  for study purposes, not for display, so I consider toning fills to be unnecessary.

Not attaching covers to textblocks; not toning fills. Aultman, Miller & Co., Swedish Buckeye Catalog, 1899.

Some of the covers and pages that are detached are also very brittle and have numerous tears. It would take too long to mend them all and the page would still not be stable for handling because of its brittleness. Enclosing a page in a Mylar L-sleeve and calling it a day is an acceptable treatment option because the item can be scanned directly through Mylar.

Enclosing the cover in Mylar after mending significant tears; not mending numerous minor tears. C. Altman & Co., Buckeye Annual Catalog, 1889.

This is one of my favorite, most irresistible images from the Skromme Collection. The artists that worked for these companies were incredibly talented and imaginative.

A cutout advertisement made from thick card stock. Bucher & Gibbs Plow Co,. Imperial Plow advertisement card, not dated.

Plow ink! who would have thought?? Bucher & Gibbs Plow Co,. Imperial Plow advertisement card, not dated.

Preserving history of use:

As I mentioned earlier, certain signs of use are evident when examining the catalogs: fold lines, dirt, water damage, ink stains. But there are other signs as well, which I think of as “signs of life”. They are traces of people who inhabited the world with these paper objects. Even though the traces of personal history are not connected to a famous individual or a specific historic event, the altered paper objects do tell a compelling story about American farm life.

Child adds some embellishments with colored pencils  in the parent’s magazine. Charles H. Childs & Co., Riding Cultivators Catalog, 1892.

The culprit’s signature on the other side of the page. Charles H. Childs & Co., Riding Cultivators Catalog, 1892.

This advertisement booklet had blank pages inside. It was used to write down recipes for baked goods and cakes. A delicious read. Instead of using a book-edge scanner, the pages of the booklet will be photographed with a digital camera on the copy stand. The booklet will be opened and supported at 90 degrees in order to safely keep the nail in place

A page with a recipe is attached to the inside of the pamphlet, using a nail. J.M. Childs & Co., Tiger Self Dump Wheel Horse Rake memorandum book, 1884.

Advertisements
CLose up of the textured surface of Tek wipe, which is a nonwoven polyester and cellulose blend.

Close-up of the textured surface of Tek wipe, which is a nonwoven polyester and cellulose blend.

The AIC Annual Meeting in 2014 was abuzz with the virtues of Tek Wipe as a paper conservation material. We had been considering purchasing some as a disaster salvage supply for a while, after seeing how much cotton blotter we used up in the recovery from the Ames Flood of 2010. As the Chair-Elect of the AIC Sustainability Committee, I find the idea of an absorbent non-woven that is washable and reusable to be very appealing. Its reusability makes this material an attractive choice from both an environmental and an economic perspective. However, it wasn’t until I started hearing about other treatment uses for the material that I got over my inertia and ordered some for our lab.  Six months of experimentation later, I’m very pleased with Tek wipe’s versatility and results.

Tek wipe on a 35" wide roll.

Tek wipe on a 35″ wide roll.

Tek wipe is a highly absorbent polyester/cellulose nonwoven textile which can be ordered by the sheet or by the roll. We chose to order a roll and cut it down to sheets that are custom sized for various purposes. We have precut sheets to keep on hand for water disaster scenarios, but I have also been using it for document washing and paper mending in place of (and sometimes in addition to) cotton blotter. For mending, I have used Tek wipe in place of the small rectangles of blotter cut to fit our glass and plexi glass weights. I still sandwich Reemay or Holytex between the Tek wipe and the mend, because the Tek wipe can stick to the mend (or even the paper support itself) if allowed to dry in direct contact.

However, where Tek wipe’s versatility really shines is as a washing material.  I’ll qualify that assertion by saying my assessments are visual and anecdotal; we haven’t the time or the resources in our lab to assess the results with technical analytics (hint, hint to the conservation graduate students out there…)  I’ve been working on a project treating about twenty issues of a mid-19th century horticulture journal suffering from water and mold damage. All of the issues exhibit black and purple mold stains, as well as caked-on surface dirt and pronounced tidelines which fluoresce under UV light. Regardless of whether the tidelines are fluorescing as an indication of mold hyphae or an indication of soluble paper degradation products, reducing them has been a desirable part of this treatment. The project has therefore offered an ideal opportunity for testing out a few different washing techniques with Tek wipe.

Tidelines fluorescing under UV light.

Tidelines fluorescing under UV light.

After the initial treatment steps of HEPA vacuuming, dry cleaning, and misting with an ethanol solution, the separated folios of the horticulture journal were then washed aqueously.  I tried three different washing techniques with Tek wipe: blotter sandwich washing, slant board washing, and a combination of immersion washing combined with abbreviated blotter sandwich washing.  Tek wipe performed usefully in all three scenarios, dramatically reducing the tidelines visible in ambient light and completely removing the fluorescing compounds.  For all three washing methods, documents were dried in a blotter/Reemay stack under weight.

Blotter Sandwich Washing

For the blotter sandwich, I used Tek wipe in place of Reemay or Hollytex.  I sandwiched the document between two piece of Tek wipe, then sandwiched the ensemble between two piece of thick cotton blotter. This method worked the best to the naked eye, completely removing all visible traces of the tidelines. All fluorescing compounds were likewise removed with this method.

Slant Board Washing

In this scenario, I used Tek wipe in lieu of a fleece, but otherwise followed standard slant board washing procedures. The Tek wipe seemed to wick a bit more slowly than fleece, but the stain was reduced almost as well as blotter sandwich washing, with slight ghosting remaining. All fluorescing compounds were also removed with this method.

Immersion Washing Followed by Abbreviated Blotter Sandwich Washing

While trying the above washing methods with Tek wipe proved informative, neither method would be suitable for the scale of this project, which requires the washing of over 200 folios. So, I decided to try immersion washing in combination with a blotter sandwich lined with Tek wipe.  Following usual procedures, I washed a Reemay stack with one full issue of the journal in multiple baths of short duration (5 minutes each): two baths in deionized water, followed by two alkaline baths. Even though the water in the final bath remained clear, some visible tidelines did remain in the documents. The documents were peeled one by one from the stack and placed in a blotter/Tek wipe sandwich stack. The documents were re-misted with recalcified water after about an hour, and left for another hour in the blotter/Tek wipe stack. This method greatly reduced the tidelines, leaving behind only faint ghosting, and removing all fluorescing compounds.  I selected this method for the remainder of the project because it produced acceptable results in a more time-efficient manner.

Before (above) and after (below) immersion washing followed by abbreviated blotter/Tek wipe sandwich washing.

Before (above) and after (below) immersion washing followed by abbreviated blotter/Tek wipe sandwich washing.

Washing the Tek wipe in very warm water and then air-drying it removed the stains the material absorbed from the washing processes above, leaving it ready to be used again.

How Are You Using Tek Wipe?

Are you using Tek wipe for conservation treatments? We’d love to hear about your experience in the comments section.  I’m especially interested to hear if anyone has tried using Tek wipe instead of blotter in a drying stack in a treatment, rather than disaster salvage, scenario, and whether that was successful.

What do you like or dislike about the material? Have you had any particular successes or failures using it? Do you have any cautions to share?  Please join the conversation!

 

I work in a department that has very little IT support, and as web development is constantly in a state of change, I need to do my own research to stay ahead of the curve. One of the best free* sites to learn about all things related to web development is www.w3schools.com. Our department also has unlimited access to www.lynda.com, but that’s not available for some. Plus, www.lynda.com gets bogged down in lessons and tutorials which can go on for hours, when sometimes a quick brush-up or how-to is all that’s needed. This allows me to get right back into my web page and implement my new idea. The site w3schools has quick, clear, easily defined answers which allow me to explore within each development tool. It has both tutorials and reference lists for HTML, CSS, JavaScript, SQL, PHP, and JQuery. The site also includes a section on web certificates, and contains an interactive color picker. What am I talking about? This site is very interactive! Not only can you read about each tool/technique, but also with its sandboxing of examples, you can try out the tools for yourself and see live results. If that’s not enough to get you started, there are over a thousand examples to peruse in your own time. This website makes it so easy that a very beginner to an advanced web designer can utilize it to its greatest potential. Best of all, it is constantly being updated. A very active and knowledgeable forum rounds out the website, so when you are still confused about actions and code writing, answers are just a click away.

* to obtain Web Certificates from this site, there is a fee involved. All other resources are free.

w3s

As you can see, the site is very well laid-out and easy to navigate. Going into the HTML section:

w3s_html1

It’s kind of hard to see in this example, but on the left side menu, you have a step-by-step html guide (starting at the very basic and moving progressively to more advanced techniques,) to HTML. In the middle of the page, is examples, and a “Try It Yourself” button. When you click on the “Try It Yourself” button, it opens to the sandbox:

w3s_sb1

Entering new code in between the <h1></h1> tag, and clicking on See Results box:

w3s_sb2b

This makes learning intuitive and fun. Each sandbox page opens in it’s own window, so going back to where you were is as simple as closing the window. Let’s go back to the HTML page. Further down the HTML page, you can see:

w3s_html2

There are links to HTML examples, or take a HTML Quiz (more than likely to help one prepare for the Web Certification that the site provides.) Clicking on the HTML Tag Reference link takes you to:

w3s_html_tagref (2)

This is very handy, as it shows all the HTML tags and also which are new or not supported in HTML5. I find the references pages very helpful when I’m updating my pages, especially as I move over to HTML5. Again, you can then use the left vertical menu to go to the specific page your interested in (this one being HTML; the other reference pages match the tool you are exploring.)

I have only dipped into the very basics of the website. The thing with this particular website is that it can get overwhelming and/or addictive. There is so much useful information here that I find myself spending way too much time on it, getting distracted from my own work. In that way, it is like www.lynda.com, but then I do not have to sigh my way through parts of a tutorial that I don’t need. Here, I can jump around and fiddle on code until I feel I understand it completely. It’s not the only site available that offers tutorials and sandboxing, but www.w3schools.com is about as thorough a website on learning these tools that I have discovered.

I’ve spent most of my last few months working on a project for the new ISU Extension Collection. The basic layout sounds simple enough: create a timeline for the important dates that this particular collection focuses on. The dates were not too far apart: 1900-1924. I’ve have seen a lot of web pages that incorporated timelines and I was excited to add this new skill to my tools. I did an online search of “timelines,” and got a whole gamut of ideas and tools.  I also started to see a basic pattern to all these timelines:

 

tl0

Basic.

 

tl2

Step up.

 

More modern.

More modern.

 

High tech.

High tech.

Google also has a timeline program. It is very similar to the High Tech version, only with a light background. But, as with most of these programs, you need to upload your information and it gets stored their servers. What happens if something happens to that program in the future? Also, all of these options take up the whole webpage to display the timeline. I wanted a timeline that was incorporated into the rest of my page, a piece of a larger puzzle on the page.

I decided to get a little more creative and put a timeline on an actual image. I had the image already in hand. I just needed a part of that image turned into a timeline, while the rest of it linked to other pages. As it turns out, there is no easy way to create a timeline on image, (I suppose if you were a hardcore programmer with mad skills, you probably could knock one out.) I don’t consider myself a complete slouch when it comes to coding, but come on, it shouldn’t be that hard to make a timeline on a relatively straight, long image. I have a hard time believing I’m the first person who wants to do such a thing. Yet, with every link clicked, none of the code and options I came across showed me how to do this. I asked myself exactly what it was I wanted to do. Well, I reasoned that the closest thing I could think of was that I was trying to create a customizable popup, or mouseover or hover-over a place on an image. Searching for that, I found several javascript codes for making pop-ups over links and/or images, which looked pretty much like tooltips on steroids. Tooltip is an alt code you can put into your html to create an effect so that when you hover your mouse over an image or link, a little yellow box pops up after a short time, giving information.

ddtooltip

Example of tooltip code in action.

I have created tooltips for our drop-down menus to indicate who certain significant people are.  I have also created tooltips to give information about certain images on pages.

imgtooltip

After discovering that it might be possible to create tooltips for a timeline, I became a little more excited.  I’m not one to toot other people’s horns, but http://www.dynamicdrive.com/ has awesome, easy-to-use, customizable code. It’s all free, as long as you include their legal notice within your code. There are two other sources that I recommend for helping in creating web pages and learning programs: http://www.lynda.com/(NOTE: not a completely free site) and http://www.w3schools.com/(the best resource for html and css, with an added bonus of sandboxing to see effects). I cannot recommend these sites enough to help get you through common webpage issues.

So, here we go. Searching on the dynamicedrive.com site opened the door to some fantastic ideas to noodle on, but how could I get a timeline actually placed on the chosen image? What I ended up doing was way old school: I made an image map. However, I didn’t do it with Adobe Photoshop. I did it online with Easy Imagemap Generator (http://imagemap-generator.dariodomi.de). (Yes, that is actually its name… and yes, it is EASY.) You do, however, need to have Flash Player for this to work. After going to the webpage, there is an option to upload the image or insert the image link URL.

imgmpgn

Upon doing this, it automagically loads your image. Just click +Add Area and start clicking on the image, making boxes, circles, or polygons around the areas you want to create into links. There are also buttons on this page that are marked X Clear All, and Change Image. Every time you want a new linked area, just click on the +Add Area button and move back into the image to create a new linked area. Once you are done with with all your linked areas, you will notice the code text is displayed at the bottom.  You can have as many linked areas as you want; I believe I had around twenty linkable areas on my image.  This is a very basic example of the code text:

<img src=”url/to/your/image.jpg” alt=”” usemap=”#Map” />

<map name=”Map” id=”Map”>

<area alt=”” title=”” href=”#” shape=”poly” coords=”134,276,150,292,122,297,111,287,119,279″ />

[…]

</map>

This is the code you will need to put into your html to make the areas you created linkable for the mouse-over pop-up box. There are many things you can do with this code to create the kind of links you want. I just selected all this code and copied and pasted it over into my html following where my image was placed on the page.

Next, I headed over to dynamicdrive.com and clicked on “Links & Tooltips.” This took me to a page with several different snippets to experiment with. Notice how after the links, it lists the browser compatibility. Remember to test your code in different browsers anyway!  The one I used was suppose to work in FF, so when it didn’t, I knew I had a code error somewhere. Once I found the code I liked, I clicked on the link, and it took me to the actual code page. From there, it goes step-by-step through the process, even allowing downloading of necessary .js and .css files. My particular code did not need separate .css or .js files, so I just coped and pasted into my document. At the end of the code, there is typically a section on modifying the settings. All in all, it was a very easy way to get the code I wanted and place it in my webpage. My html code ended up looking something like this:

html-code

If you notice, since I am using an image map, I needed to tweak a few settings here and there to make the image map display the tooltip script correctly. The code I used on dynamicdrive.com was called “Cool DTML Tooltip II,” and what is there is slightly different from what I ended up using. Using it exactly as it is on that site resulted in no text popping up, even though the boxes themselves were appearing. It took me a while to figure out that i n order for the area shape to have the desired effect, I needed to put the area shape outside the ONMOUSEOVER code. (In other words, I couldn’t place it before the closing />.) Also, notice that my first area code is different from the second, and subsequent, codes. I had to do this in order for the desired effect to work in Firefox. I believe I had to do this because I had several clickable areas on one large image, instead of several smaller images all together.  Whatever the reason, I did get the effect to work in the end by altering the code in this way. I changed the color of the pop-up background and text size and style in the css. (The ddrivetip used “dhtmltooltip.”) Also, you can make the tooltip linkable. I did not do this for my timeline, but it is possible.

This is an example of the final results:

imagemap

In conclusion, I felt this was a better approach than the other official applications. It allowed me to customize the timeline to fit the needs of the project. It may not be a timeline in the strictest capacity, but I believe it satisfies the requirements for this particular collection.

DigCollFrontPage

Earlier this year, Digital Initiatives started implementing Google Analytics (on January 6, 2014).  I thought at the time that switching to this program would make a great blog post: I’d have plenty of time to install the code, work through the CONTENTdm tutorial, and then have a good month to tweak any settings and report back to the group. Since then, I’ve realized it’s not going to be that easy.

First, let me explain how we harvest statistics. Bill Yungclas is responsible for the CONTENTdm part of our stats, and I am responsible for the offsite web pages. CONTENTdm has an in-app stat program (including item views per collection, items views by country, items in collection) and I use StatCounter (including page views, unique visits, first time visits, returning visits).  StatCounter is easy to set up, and works like a charm. CONTENTdm calculates compound objects using a different formula than Google Analytics: “…total views per object are displayed, as well as the number of views per page.” OK, so it sounds like they track compound objects differently, and that those “pages” might skew upwards. If accurate, this is probably a good reason for CONTENTdm to move away from in-app stat tracking and recommend Google Analytics; the latter tracks each page clicked on.  So, there are issues between how CONTENTdm and Google Analytics track: primarily, the stats are inconsistent.

Bill and I did an experiment, and it appears Google Analytics is correctly tracking each page. However, in the short overlap between the two tracking apps, the counts aren’t anywhere near being equal.

Herein lies the issue: is CONTENTdm bloating the stats, or, is Google Analytics not counting correctly? Since our experimentation with page clicks appears to identify that the latter is working correctly, then, we have to imagine that CONTENTdm is indeed skewing the stats. An example: CONTENTdm tells us that total items viewed for January 2014 was 62,453. Google Analytics says “nuh-uh;” it’s really 896 visits to our site with 3,984 individual page views.  Yikes! 62,353 vs. 3,984 works out to +/- 58,369 difference in views. So what exactly is CONTENTdm counting and what does an “item view” constitute for them? I’d like to say the 3,984 page views from Google Analytics is off, but considering that StatCounter lists 536 hits for our offsite home page, and Google Analytics is saying it tracked 475 during the similar period for the onsite home page, I have to think that Google Analytics is more accurate. Suddenly, my nice little blog post has expanded to one that needs further investigation, insight, and time.

Beginning in March, I’m going to begin tracking our offsite web pages with Google Analytics to see how the stats compare to StatCounter. We’ll have to wait to see what a full month using Google Analytics does to our numbers, and I have a feeling that the count isn’t going to be anywhere near the 60,000 range. We are hoping to stop using CONTENTdm for tracking (Bill was told it’s being discontinued, and it could be any day) but we will have to do some soul-searching in the meantime.

I’ve made many boxes since starting in the Preservation Department back in October 1997, but had never worked with the material Coroplast (R).   If you are not familiar with this product, it is a corrugated plastic board, similar to corrugated paperboard.  Our stock in the lab are 30” x 40” sheets which are 3mm thick, translucent white, and very smooth.

WorkingWithDifferentMaterials-1

The item we decided to box in Coroplast was a large (36” x 20”) floppy, spiral-bound music score. It was going to need extra support, but also had to remain lightweight enough to be carried by a single person.

WorkingWithDifferentMaterials-2

Coroplast is a challenge to bend and since I hadn’t worked with it previously, I got out a few scrap pieces to “play around” with and get a feel for the material.  For test samples, I worked with small pieces of Coroplast, cutting it on the boardshear and scoring it on the board crimper so I could bend it.  I also tested the strength of Velcro buttons to see how they worked in sticking to the Coroplast and holding the box closed, as I didn’t want to use ribbon ties to keep the box closed.

WorkingWithDifferentMaterials-3

After being satisfied with my test samples, I was ready to tackle this large box.  Double-stick adhesive tape worked great to hold the large pieces together.  The final box had two pieces meeting together at a seam down the middle of the front.  I did not like that, because if water were to ever leak on to the box, it could seep in down through the crack. I would change my design next time to avoid that.

WorkingWithDifferentMaterials-4

However, this time I decided to cut one additional sheet and Velcro it over the top of the box, thus protecting it from possible water damage.  This box turned out very well, as it gave the book support and protection, but is still easy enough for one person to carry it.   I enjoyed working with this material and I recommend others try their hand at working with Coroplast on a future project.

WorkingWithDifferentMaterials-5

Written by Hope Mitchell, Student Technician in the Conservation Lab

TextblockPages

As a student technician, one of the things I enjoy the most about my job is the variety; every day has the potential to be completely different from the last and teach me something new and unexpected about conservation. Recently, I was given a book of paint chips titled Color and Color Names, by Gladys and Gustave Plochere, from our General Collection. Published in 1946, Color and Color Names contains 1,536 different color samples. My mission seemed simple: flip through the book and glue down any loose paint chips. What began as a simple task soon turned into nearly a week of poking and prodding over 1,500 paint chips with a microspatula.

Everything was going according to plan until I reached the purple section, where I noticed that the color had begun flaking off the chips. Initially, I tried swiping some PVA over the chip; while that held the flaking paint in place and didn’t compromise the color, it gave the chip a glossy look that didn’t match with the other matte chips.  Realizing that I was in over my head, I asked our conservator, Melissa, what I should do. She suggested that I test a small corner of the paint chip with the consolidant Klucel-G. Ideally, this would help to seal the paint, but there was also a chance that the Klucel-G would shift the color. Sure enough, it did, so we moved on to plan B…

TestPatches

After testing with Klucel-G (lower right corner) and methylcellulose (upper left corner).

Plan B consisted of using water-based methylcellulose instead of solvent-based Klucel-G. Once again, I brushed a small amount of methylcellulose on the corner of the paint chip to determine whether or not it would shift the color. We decided that it would be best to test the methylcellulose on a different corner of the same chip that we had used to test the Klucel-G, our logic being that it was probably best not to risk distorting another chip.  Also, testing on the same color gave us a truer comparison between the effects of the Klucel-G and methylcellulose.   In the end, the methylcellulose was a success! It stabilized the flaking paint without compromising the color, and without making the matte paint chip glossy.

WetDryMethylcell

During and After: wet methylcellulose just applied to the paint chip (left); the paint chip after the methylcellulose had dried (right).

Next Page »